2014 COLLEGES LOOKING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

COLLEGES LOOKING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

I play volleyball in high school now and i was wondering what things (even little details) colleges look at in a volleyball player.

Thank you :)

Answer by Hannah
depends on what position you play. for example, a D1 college wants their middle blocker to be able to touch 10 foot. it all just depends on the position.

Answer by Taryn
When you are being scouted they look for an athlete that is committed to the game or sport! You need to have a positive attitude on the court at all times and stay positive with your team members!! Don’t get upset if you lose a game because when their is 5 games in a match you still have a game to catch up and don’t put yourself out of the game stay strong and play at the best of your ability!

Answer by spartans_girl_30
obviously ability: passing, setting, hitting, serving
technique
GRADES

“My advice to anyone is to let your life live you. You don’t have to rule yourself with an iron hand, because if you let it, the divine plan of your life will direct you. Anything is possible if you can think it clearly and hold it passionately.

“Anything unrealized is not important; what is important is the quality of each step that you take along the way. Everything you do is important, even if it doesn’t seem so at the time. If you apply your full attention, everything will always be just as it should be.” –Mary Jo Peppler

For any of you who don’t know, Mary Jo Peppler is the original Misty May of volleyball. She is a four-time USVBA National Open Tournament Most Valuable Player. She won a gold medal on the 1967 U.S. Pan American Team, and was also named to All Tournament Team. At the 1970 World Championships, she was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. The list goes on and on.

So what does Peppler have to say about college recruiting?

1. Be sure you are registered with the NCAA clearinghouse

2. Contact a minimum of 100 colleges, preferably around 200-300. Contact a couple each day, or set aside one day a week. Tell them that you are interested in their school. Tell them where you go to high school and where you play club.

Let them know your academic goals, and give them a current GPA, as well as ACT or SAT scores (or, if you haven’t taken them, let them know when you will have them). Send them your SCVA schedule. Let them know what qualifiers your team will attend.

3. Respond to any colleges promptly. Unless they already have you on your radar, they will probably give you a generic response and ask you to fill out some forms so that they have information on you and have a way to contact you. Respond to them even if you don’t think you are interested, because you truly never know.

4. Be sure your responses are organized in a file or notebook and sort them in some type of order of preference. You probably don’t know your exact preferences, so keep your options open. You should be sorting your schools on a regular basis, because your priorities will keep changing. Re-evaluate your schools and re-contact the ones you even have mild interest in.

5. Take time to make ‘Unofficial Visits’ to schools you might be interested in. Look in this area for schools you may not have considered or in any area that you travel. An ‘unofficial visit’ is a visit that you arrange with a college volleyball coach in which you pay all the expenses.

Don’t just visit a school without contacting the school. If the volleyball program is on break, often the school will be able to arrange for someone to host you and show you around the school, point out its merits and answer questions for you. Call the coach at a school and tell them that you are interested in their school and would like to make an ‘unofficial visit’ on a certain date. Ask them if they would be available to host you.

When you arrange a day to visit, the volleyball staff will give you a tour, tell you about their program, possibly introduce you to their team (if they are in season or practicing) and arrange for a meeting with an academic counselor.

Each visit is different because each college experience is different. Visiting is the best way to sort through what criteria will be important to you as you narrow down the options and get closer to making a decision. Visit Division I, II, III and NAIA schools so you can see what the differences are and which you would prefer.

Note: You will be allowed up to 5 ‘Official Visits’ during your Senior year. An ‘Official Visit’ is a visit that a college coach offers to you and the college pays all your expenses. Official Visits last 48 hours. Official Visits are usually offered to players who are on the verge of being or who have been offered a scholarship.

To anyone wanting to play in college, I highly recommend following Peppler’s suggestions. It seems like a lot of work, but it will pay off for the whole of your college career.

And remember, hard work beats talent when talent fails to work hard.

I’m interested in playing college volleyball and am entering my junior year as a varsity ds. Are there any things I should be doing or that would help me to get noticed?

Answer by Jack
get into some leagues, get noticed.
go to tournaments, get noticed
post yourself up on youtube might work.
ummm go to clinics and excel there
maybe go to a tournament where you are versing that college then have a secret chat 2 one of them!

best of luck

Answer by LadyVikes8
Join universityathelete.com
They have a list of tournaments where colleges will be as well as ample room to tell about yourself.

Answer by gordonmorrison
Go to the below link to find out all of the steps you need to do to get the NCAA steps you need. You need certain classes and you need to file things in time to play in the NCAA.
If you play club on a travel team, you will be seen at the qualifiers. I was at Lone Star and I saw 40 college coaches that I knew. That means there mere many more there, but I saw 40 that I knew.
Go to the web site for the schools that you would like to attend. Find out if they have an online form to fill out.
If you do not play travel club, you will need to get together a video. You should include an introduction, and then several minutes of all of the skills during a controlled practice and them some footage of you actually playing. You do not want to make it hours, They will turn it off after about 30 minutes.
That should be enough to get you started. Do this starting today. As an incoming junior, you need to get this done right away. There are players that are filling out those forms as incoming freshmen.
If you have any futher questions, please fell free to email me.

COLLEGES LOOKING FOR VOLLEYBALL PLAYERS

“My advice to anyone is to let your life live you. You don’t have to rule yourself with an iron hand, because if you let it, the divine plan of your life will direct you. Anything is possible if you can think it clearly and hold it passionately.

“Anything unrealized is not important; what is important is the quality of each step that you take along the way. Everything you do is important, even if it doesn’t seem so at the time. If you apply your full attention, everything will always be just as it should be.” –Mary Jo Peppler

For any of you who don’t know, Mary Jo Peppler is the original Misty May of volleyball. She is a four-time USVBA National Open Tournament Most Valuable Player. She won a gold medal on the 1967 U.S. Pan American Team, and was also named to All Tournament Team. At the 1970 World Championships, she was named the tournament’s most outstanding player. The list goes on and on.

So what does Peppler have to say about college recruiting?

1. Be sure you are registered with the NCAA clearinghouse

2. Contact a minimum of 100 colleges, preferably around 200-300. Contact a couple each day, or set aside one day a week. Tell them that you are interested in their school. Tell them where you go to high school and where you play club.

Let them know your academic goals, and give them a current GPA, as well as ACT or SAT scores (or, if you haven’t taken them, let them know when you will have them). Send them your SCVA schedule. Let them know what qualifiers your team will attend.

3. Respond to any colleges promptly. Unless they already have you on your radar, they will probably give you a generic response and ask you to fill out some forms so that they have information on you and have a way to contact you. Respond to them even if you don’t think you are interested, because you truly never know.

4. Be sure your responses are organized in a file or notebook and sort them in some type of order of preference. You probably don’t know your exact preferences, so keep your options open. You should be sorting your schools on a regular basis, because your priorities will keep changing. Re-evaluate your schools and re-contact the ones you even have mild interest in.

5. Take time to make ‘Unofficial Visits’ to schools you might be interested in. Look in this area for schools you may not have considered or in any area that you travel. An ‘unofficial visit’ is a visit that you arrange with a college volleyball coach in which you pay all the expenses.

Don’t just visit a school without contacting the school. If the volleyball program is on break, often the school will be able to arrange for someone to host you and show you around the school, point out its merits and answer questions for you. Call the coach at a school and tell them that you are interested in their school and would like to make an ‘unofficial visit’ on a certain date. Ask them if they would be available to host you.

When you arrange a day to visit, the volleyball staff will give you a tour, tell you about their program, possibly introduce you to their team (if they are in season or practicing) and arrange for a meeting with an academic counselor.

Each visit is different because each college experience is different. Visiting is the best way to sort through what criteria will be important to you as you narrow down the options and get closer to making a decision. Visit Division I, II, III and NAIA schools so you can see what the differences are and which you would prefer.

Note: You will be allowed up to 5 ‘Official Visits’ during your Senior year. An ‘Official Visit’ is a visit that a college coach offers to you and the college pays all your expenses. Official Visits last 48 hours. Official Visits are usually offered to players who are on the verge of being or who have been offered a scholarship.

To anyone wanting to play in college, I highly recommend following Peppler’s suggestions. It seems like a lot of work, but it will pay off for the whole of your college career.

And remember, hard work beats talent when talent fails to work hard.

It’s very important that you understand the rules of beach volleyball before you just go out on the sand and start trying to play. Don’t assume that just because you played indoor volleyball in high school or college that you know the how to play sand volleyball. The game is much different and is a different sport entirely.

The one similarity between indoor and outdoor is that passing. If you can pass well you will be a great player on the beach and on the hard court. The difference that you will have to get use to is passing a ball that is lighter, less inflated and slightly larger than the typical indoor ball. You will find that it is easier to pass a ball that is larger and less pumped up. So your passing will not suffer when you make the transition from indoor to beach volleyball.

Let’s take a typical play and dissect it. So you are playing your fist game of beach volleyball, the other team serves the ball and it’s high so you take the serve with your hands, then your partner sets you the ball and you have a blocker up so you tip it over him and get the point. Good job right? NO! You made 2 vital errors that would cost you the point. In sand volleyball you cannot set the serve and you cannot open hand tip the ball. These are 2 of the most often made mistakes made in beach volleyball. Don’t break these rules because they will make you look like a beginner.

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